\\ Good Bacteria

GanedenBC30™ is the trademarked brand name of the patented bacteria strain Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086. It is a Gram-positive spore-forming bacterium that, once germinated, produces L+ lactic acid, supporting good bacteria in the gut, displacing non-beneficial bacteria.

A high-survivability probiotic, or good bacteria, GanedenBC30 has many inherent physical properties that make it superior to other traditional probiotic bacteria strains such as lactobacillus, acidophilus and bifidobacteria:

  • GanedenBC30 withstands severe manufacturing process. GanedenBC30 has been shown to survive through high temperature processes such as baking and boiling, low temperature processes such as freezing and refrigeration and high pressure applications like extrusion and roll forming. In short, GanedenBC30 is the probiotic that can take it.
  • GanedenBC30 has been proven to be extremely hearty and is self-affirmed GRAS for use in food and beverages. Learn more about probiotic foods ».

The spore-forming nature of GanedenBC30 provides superior viability and excellent stability, making it an ideal choice for product development, compared to other probiotic bacteria strains, such as lactobacillus, acidophilus and bifidobacteria.

  • GanedenBC30 requires no refrigeration and can be formulated into products to have up to a two-year shelf life.
  • GanedenBC30 has been shown to help support the immune system and regulate the digestive system by successfully colonizing the intestines.
  • GanedenBC30 is a spore-forming probiotic bacterium. Inside the bacterial cell is a hardened structure, or spore, which is analogous to a seed. This spore safeguards the cell’s genetic material from the heat and pressure of manufacturing processes, challenges of shelf life and the acid and bile it is exposed to during transit to the digestive system. Once it is safely inside the small intestine, the viable spore is then able to germinate and produce new vegetative cells or good bacteria. Other ‘traditional’ probiotic organisms, such as lactobacillus, acidophilus and bifidobacteria are not able to form these protective spores, making them vulnerable to heat, pressure, shelf life variables and the acid and bile challenges of the digestive system.